Book Review: Free Will

Free Will

Harris explores the notion that free will is an illusion in this nimble book (which, at 83 pages, can be read in one sitting or a couple of Metro rides), amiably and conversationally jumping from point to point. The book’s length is one of its charms: He never belabors any one topic or idea, sticking around exactly as long as he needs to in order to lay out his argument (and tackle the rebuttals that it will inevitably provoke) and not a page longer. Go to article

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Win an Audiobook of Ayn Rand this Xmas!!!

I have decided to give a Christmas gift for my readers!  Starting today, December 05 until December 15 at 23:59 (UTC/GMT -6 hours) I will open the comment area of this post for you to WIN ONE AUDIOBOOK written by Ayn Rand!!!

THE OPTIONS ARE:

HOW TO WIN?

  1. Click “Like” in the Facebook Box on the Right.
  2. Write a comment and register with a valid e-mail in the Comment Area of this post.
    1. Share a short bio of who you are, where you live, etc.
    2. Include which book of the previous list you want to read (actually, to listen) and why.
    3. Tell us why you like Ayn Rand’s ideas, since when have you studied her works and which is your favorite book by her. Or maybe this will be your first time reading (listening) one of her books? Tell us that too and why you decided to participate!

WINNER ANNOUNCEMENT

  • I will announce the winner on December 16th. here at www.capitalisthistory.com after writing all your names in a paper, mixing them in a bag and choosing one without seeing!
  • The winner will receive the gift code of his chosen book from me on December 25th.


“The charming aspect of Christmas is the fact that it expresses good will in a cheerful, happy, benevolent, non-sacrificial way. One says: “Merry Christmas”—not “Weep and Repent.” And the good will is expressed in a material, earthly form—by giving presents to one’s friends, or by sending them cards in token of remembrance . . . .” Ayn Rand

In the Shadow of Slavery: Africa’s Botanical Legacy in the Atlantic World

rice
Image by tamaki via Flickr
map: United States, 1860, percentage of the sl...
Image via Wikipedia

Today I finished reading the Kindle book In the Shadow of Slavery: Africa’s Botanical Legacy in the Atlantic World by Judith Carney and Richard Nicholas Rosomoff; and I have confirmed that the work of any historian cannot be done without the help of Geography and a Globalized view of the power behind migrations. In her book, the author made very clear the effects of this forced migration of black slaves to America and how they changed the botanical future of the whole American Continent.  Reading this also was a great way of remembering when I worked as Collection Developer of the Wilson Popenoe Library (2,300 items) at the Ludwig von Mises Library.  His was a fantastic bibliography and you could see in his books how he managed to be the first exporter of Avocados to The United States.

 

Now, I invite you to check the book review via Project MUSE® prepared by Brian Grabbatin,

Many geographers know Judith Carney from her award-winning book Black Rice: The African Origins of Rice Cultivation in the Americas (2001). There she explored the development of rice growing techniques in Africa and subsequent role of enslaved Africans in transferring those techniques to North American plantations, particularly in the South Carolina low-country. In the Shadow of Slavery, a new book coauthored by Carney and independent researcher Richard Nicholas Rosomoff, builds on these findings, examining how enslaved Africans participated in botanical exchanges that have shaped foodways in the Atlantic world. In contrast to Black Rice, this book focuses on a variety of subsistence crops instead of a single cash … Read More

Monday book: History of Money and Banking.

The master teacher of American economic history covers money and banking in the whole of American history, to show that the meltdown of our times is hardly the first. And guess what caused them in the past? Paper money, loose credit, reckless lending standards, government profligacy, and central banking. Buy it in Amazon.com! (Kindle version available)